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  • Lori Haskell

Insurance Companies Have Professionals Working For Them--And You Need One Too

Insurance companies spend millions of dollars and thousands of hours training professionals to work them. The job of a claims representative is quite simple. His or her job is to diminish the value of your case. Be it your own insurer or the adverse (the defendant's) carrier. Every word you say is either recorded on tape or written down in a log--and those words can come back to haunt you if you're not careful. A claims representative will call you repeatedly at all hours as part of a strategy to wear you down. They will ask you seemingly innocent questions and your answers, unwittingly, can be used against you later ("...wasn't the sun in your eyes that time of day?".) This applies to your own insurer as well as the defendant's insurance company.


What you need is a skilled attorney trained in this area of the law. Someone who is savvy enough to protect you from the probing questions of a claims representative. And claims representatives from insurance companies typically call seeking information when you are still in shock that you were in an accident and dealing with the physical fallout such as headaches, nausea, pain and confusion. You are overwhelmed and the claims representative knows that. And they assure you (falsely) that you need to sign a release so that they have access to every medical record ever generated on you.


Once you retain an attorney the insurance company cannot have direct contact with you. It is unethical. The constant phone calls stop. The insurer is now prevented from trying to get you to say something that unerringly may harm your case. Get a professional on your side. You are dealing with one hired by the insurance company. Level the playing field and hire your own. Studies show that people are likely to settle a case for three times more compensation when they have an attorney.

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